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Marumoto teabolt
Marumoto

Matcha, the powdered green tea – the most noble variety
Matcha tea gained a great deal of publicity in the recent past; its wondrous effects, however, have been known for centuries in Japan. Matcha’s specialty is a property of the grinding process. Selected leaves of the highest quality and variety of tea shrubs are ground to a fine powder between granite stones. Tea made this way contains the tea plant itself, while the brew is not filtered as it is customary with other varieties. It is thanks to this process that Matcha tea contains more than ten times as much antioxidants as traditional green teas; antioxidants have numerous beneficial effects upon the health of regular tea consumers. Matcha is produced exclusively in Japan with a capacity of 40g per granite mill per hour, so it is considered a true rarity. In recent years, the tea powder has not just been used to make tea, but has also appeared in countless gastronomical fields. The tea shop’s line-up also includes confectionary Matcha, which can be used with sponge cakes, crackers and other pastries, or even ice cream.

Matcha Tenko

Matcha Tenko

Flavourful premium green tea powder • 30g

31.50ADD to cart
Matcha Myōju

Matcha Myōju

High grade green tea powder (Usucha) • 40g

28.90ADD to cart
Matcha Isuzu

Matcha Isuzu

High grade green tea powder (Usucha) • 40g

21.50ADD to cart
Quick Matcha

Quick Matcha

10 pieces of green tea powder stick

13.30ADD to cart
Matcha Kinrin

Matcha Kinrin

High grade green tea powder (Koicha) • 40g

42.60ADD to cart
Matcha Shiro no Kotobuki

Matcha Shiro no Kotobuki

High grade green tea powder (Usucha) • 30g

26.60ADD to cart
Matcha Wako

Matcha Wako

High grade green tea powder (Usucha) • 40g

34.10ADD to cart
Matcha Daigyoku

Matcha Daigyoku

Flavourful premium green tea powder • 30g

21.90ADD to cart
Matcha Matsu no Midori

Matcha Matsu no Midori

High grade green tea powder (usucha) • 30g

18.30ADD to cart
Cooking Matcha Classic

Cooking Matcha Classic

Confectionery green tea powder • 500 g

97.80ADD to cart
Sweet Matcha

Sweet Matcha

Powdered Green Tea with Sugar • 200g

14.40ADD to cart
Cooking Hōjicha Powder

Cooking Hōjicha Powder

Roasted tea powder for culinary uses • 50g

13.30ADD to cart
Cooking Matcha Economy

Cooking Matcha Economy

Confectionery green tea powder • 1000 g

117.80ADD to cart
Matcha Eiraku

Matcha Eiraku

High grade green tea powder (Usucha) • 40g

21.10ADD to cart
Matcha Jurei

Matcha Jurei

High grade green tea powder (Usucha) • 40g

17.00ADD to cart
Cooking Matcha Premium

Cooking Matcha Premium

Confectionery green tea powder • 1 kg

255.20ADD to cart
Matcha Yugen

Matcha Yugen

High grade green tea powder (Usucha) • 40g

28.90ADD to cart

The role of Matcha tea in healthcare
Everyone is familiar with the beneficial effects of green tea. Being the essence of green tea, Matcha possesses all of these qualities. It has the highest level of antioxidants among all foods. Antioxidants prevent the harmful effects of aging, reduce the risk of developing chronic illnesses and strengthen the immune system. Consumption of the Matcha tea reduces stress while still maintaining alertness, is good for the memory and helps concentration. Additionally, it may be consumed as a coffee substitute, as it is just as energizing as a cup of espresso, and without its side effects, such as an elevated pulse or hypertension. Matcha tea is good for the metabolism, its fat-burning properties are also known. It also plays a significant role in detoxification and reduces the level of bad cholesterol while increasing the level of good cholesterol.

Growing and producing Matcha
The method of making Japanese tea powder – with its nearly thousand years of history – has remained mostly unchanged from the very beginning; the tea that is the basis of Matcha has been grown in the same areas for centuries. Even the method of growing is special: during the three-four weeks prior to the planned picking, a shade is pulled over the tea plantations, which can be a hay roof placed on columns or at more modern facilities, an adjustable dense metal mesh. As a result of this method, the plant begins to produce more amino acids and chlorophyll so as to be able to make better use of the diminished light. This is what gives the leaves their characteristic, deep green colour and gently sweet flavour. Subsequently, the plants are gradually shaded more and more and when the time of the Matcha harvest arrives, the plant is under as much as 90% shade. Good quality Matcha tea comes from more than 10 year old tea shrubs, but shrubs that are older than this are not uncommon, either.

After picking the new, but grown shoots, they are collected and transported immediately to the factory and steamed carefully to prevent fermentation. Contrary to classical Sencha, Matcha tea is not rolled. It is dried in a machine after placement on a production line, and thus Aracha is obtained; the Aracha still contains the leaf stem and the leaf blade as well. The Aracha ages in cooled warehouses for months, until the next step. A careful sorting takes place afterwards, when the veins of the leaves are removed and they are cut up to size. The clean tea obtained after sorting is Tencha, which is also used almost exclusively for Matcha production. During the last step, the Tencha is ground into a fine powder between granite millstones. Nowadays this process is automated, but even so, it takes a lot of attention to make sure that the stones are moving at the appropriate speed. This process is followed by packaging.

Chanoyu – Matcha tea in the Japanese tea ceremony
The entirety of the traditional tea ceremony is built around Matcha tea, although in the last century the ceremonies of loose tea have also become wide-spread. Naturally, Matcha need not be made or consumed only on the occasion of the tea ceremony. There are many known methods of making this tea; the most well-known are thin tea (usucha) and thick tea (koicha). Just as their name indicates, the difference between the teas comes from the varied density.

Prior to drinking Matcha, it is generally worth eating something sweet to sweeten the mouth cavity, thereby giving the tea an even more pleasant flavour. At a significant tea gathering, after consuming a little bit of food and sweets, the substantive element of the tea ceremony, the koicha follows, while the usucha appears at the end of the ceremony, as a kind of secondary tea. Koicha is so dense that the last sip nearly sticks to the bottom of the tea bowl (chawan), while the usucha is a much more easily drinkable, frothy version, therefore it is much more wide-spread than its thicker counterpart. The making of koicha requires deep expertise, the delicate movements are indescribable with mere words. As the first step of the process, five tea spoons (chasaku) of Matcha are placed in the pre-heated chawan. Subsequently, we add some hot water and with the assistance of the tea whisk (chasen) we carefully begin to cream it. When the Matcha is ready for the water to be added, we do so and continue the process. The final result is the koicha in a yoghurt-like state, in which a total of 6 g of Matcha tea is mixed with less than 1 dl of water. Usucha is thinner, made of approximately 2 g of Matcha tea and barely 1 dl of water. The surface of the well-made thin tea is frothy but at the same time smooth , and has no large bubbles.

The home of Matcha
As mentioned above, the growing areas of Matcha tea have not changed for a long time. True matcha is only made in Japan; even though it has been tried many times throughout Asia to copy the growing and production processes, none have succeeded. The best quality is produced in the Kyoto region, and this is where Marumoto’s Matcha teas derive from.

Watch our video on how to make matcha